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Jade Plant Propagation

by Constantina
(Berkeley, California, USA)

Question:


I started an indoor jade plant from a leaf cutting in early February. I have kept it in full sun and have watered it sparingly. The leaf cutting has taken root, but it has yet to produce little plantlets over two months later. However, the leaf cutting itself looks healthy and is still firmly rooted in the pot. Should I be concerned? Is there anything else I can do to encourage it to grow?

Answer:

First of all I would not keep cuttings in full sun. Try to choose a bright but not sunny spot for cuttings.
I would give the cutting a few more weeks before you give up on it. This process can be quite slow at times.
If it does not start to produce a plant try with a stem cutting. It might be easier and quicker to get a new plant.
The cutting should be about 2 inches long. Remove the bottom leaves and let the cutting dry off for a day. Then insert it into some potting soil and water it lightly. Keep the cutting in a shaded place until it shows signs of new growth.

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